eBatts.com Battery News

Laptops, Digital Cameras, Camcorders, Cell Phones, Cordless Phones and UPS Batteries
EBatts.com Batteries | Laptop Batteries | Camcorder Batteries | Digital Camera Batteries | Cell Phone Batteries | Cordless Phone Batteries | PDA Batteries | Portable Power
UPS Batteries | Power Tool Batteries | Batteries and Chargers | Batteries by Manufacturer | My Account | Contact Us | Battery Tips | Help | Battery Specials

Google Glasses Tempt Olympus and Apple to Join the Spectacle-Fray

clock July 6, 2012 01:07 by author Jeremy

Last week, Google showed off their latest advances with their Google Glasses: several professionals jumped out of a helicopter, equipped with the Google Glasses Explorer Edition, and made their way towards the I/O 2012 Event. This week, we're seeing two other companies who may possibly tred along the same path of technological-eyewear: Apple and Olympus.

Olympus' headgear doesn't actually have a camera like the Google Glasses do, nor are they a standalone-unit. Instead, the augmented reality spectacles will connect via bluetooth to your smartphone or tablet. Olympus boasts that the Meg 4.0, the current prototype, will last for 8 hours; however, they expect users to use the glasses in 15-second spurts every three minutes, which just doesn't seem as feasible.

Meanwhile, Apple doesn't even have a working unit yet. Their big news comes in the form of a patent granted to them earlier this week. The patent allows for a dual-lens, dual-HUD eyeglass that projects images directly to your eyes. This would provide a more immersed experience than just simple glasses. Also, by using stereoscopic projection, the user would more likely avoid motion-sickness.

The Olympus augmented-reality glasses have no current release date, and Apple's "iGlass" (for lack of an official name) hasn't even been touted as a product idea - a patent doesn't necessarily mean there's already a game-plan behind it. However, if Apple does join the fray, then we'd be closer to centralizing our market on eyewear and heads-up displays...which definitely can't be a bad thing.

Sources: slashgear, gizmodo



Spray-On Batteries Replace Your Painted Walls

clock June 30, 2012 01:09 by author Jeremy

Rice University graduate Neelam Singh and a team of researchers had recently started working on a new "spray-on" battery. And by spray-on, we mean paint. Imagine painting an entire wall with a color, only to realize it's one massive battery (or numerous batteries all connected).

The paint consists of five layers, with each layer bringing the necessary materials for a battery: cathodes, anodes and polymer separators. The initial experiment involved nine bathroom tile-based batteries that were connected together, with a solar cell on one tile. Overall, the batteries pumped out 2.4 volts and managed to power lights that spelled out "Rice" for 6 hours.

This experiment only marks the beginning of this new technology, and it paves the way for the creation of newer types of batteries. Currently, certain Lithium-Ion batteries are ruling the technological field, but they are limited due to their size and shape. With paintable batteries, gadgets could use up less space for batteries and more space for powerful upgrades.

Sources: cnet.com, nature.com



Google I/O 2012 - Jelly Bean, Nexus 7, Nexus Q, and Project Glass

clock June 28, 2012 00:40 by author Jeremy

Today marked the start of Google's I/O 2012 event. Their main attraction, which was heavily hinted at, was the release of their latest Android version, 4.1 Jelly Bean. With each new iteration of the OS, we acquire faster processing speeds and better software. Google opened up by introducing Project Butter, which is what makes the processes on Jelly Bean smoother. "In Jelly Bean we also introduced triple buffering in the graphics pipeline... this allows the CPU and GPU to run in parallel without waiting for each other." The entire OS now runs at 60 fps consistently. The devices running Jelly Bean now also bring more CPU power as soon as you touch the screen, and the OS anticipates where your finger will be next.

Perhaps one of the more exciting features of Jelly Bean, however, is its voice-search function. Similar to the Apple iPhone's Siri, the Android device will answer questions or perform tasks you issue via voice. The demonstration Google provided seemed very slick, and responses arrived quickly as well.

A new feature, Google Now, will memorize patterns of behavior, as well as using your calendar and search history. In case you routinely take a bus, Google Now will keep this in mind and offer regular bus routes. Google Now can even keep updated information on your favorite sports teams.

Currently, only the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus S, and Xoom are scheduled to get Jelly Bean, and their OTA updates will arrive mid-July.

Hardware-wise, I/O '12 saw the release of the Nexus 7, a Google-tablet made in conjunction with Asus. The Nexus 7 is a 7-inch tablet with a 1280x800 HD display, a Tegra 3 chipset, quad-core CPU, and 12-core GPU. Since the device was built around Google Play (which replaced the previous Android Market), the tablet more-than-efficiently makes use of screen space when reading books/magazines and watching videos downloaded from the market. The tablet is available starting today at $199.

Google also showed off their Nexus Q today, a social steaming media player. The Nexus Q is a little black ball that connects to either your television or external speakers. When controlled by your devices, the Nexus Q will pull media from the Google Play Store to play to their connected devices. All this is done via the cloud, of course, and multiple Q's can be played simultaneously, turning your entire house into a media-centric home. The downside to the Q is that it currently only supports the Google Play Store, meaning no access to Netflix or Spotify.

Last but not least, Google showed off a spectacular preview of Project Glass: skydivers equipped with a version of their Google Glass Explorer Edition made their way toward the Moscone building via air (and even rapelled in through the roof), while the entire crowd watched. Designed to fit like glasses, these spectacles (if you can call them that) are positioned just above your eyes in order to capture video directly from your point of view. It can store video internally (albeit not much, yet), and is available for pre-order in the US at Google I/O only, for $1500.

Source (and pictures): TheVerge



Microsoft Surface Announced at Press Event

clock June 19, 2012 22:35 by author Jeremy

Rumors have been abuzz for days over Microsoft's press event yesterday. Most claimed that Microsoft would unveil their own tablet; the rumors were right. Finally, the big Windows-creator will be joining the tablet market under their latest product, the Microsoft Surface.

The tablet will be available in two versions: one runs with Windows 8 on Intel's Ivy Bridge chips, while the other is powered by Windows RT on an ARM chipset. The two versions are slightly different in several aspects as well, changing in software, hardware, and size. However, both products are 10.6-inches, will have a built-in kickstand, and are built with a magnesium casing. There are also additional keyboard-covers purchasable for either tablet, available in either the touch-variety or type-variety.

The Windows 8-powered Surface tablet will come in either 64GB or 128GB of storage space, supports USB 3.0, and has a 10.6-inch ClearType "Full HD" display. This model also has the bonus of additional digital ink support that utilizes a pen which magnetically connects to the tablet. Meanwhile, the ARM-powered version has slightly less space, arriving in either 32GB or 64GB, but still has the 10.6-inch ClearType HD display.

Microsft says that the Intel-tablet will efficiently compete against other Intel Ultrabooks, and the ARM-tablet can hold it's own against other ARM-competitors. The ARM-tablet is currently expected to ship out when Windows 8 releases in October, with the Intel tablet following three months afterwards.

Source: TheVerge



Apple Files Patent for iPhone's Swappable Lenses

clock June 19, 2012 00:16 by author Jeremy

As if smartphones weren't encroaching on the camera industry's turf enough, Apple's latest plans may sway a few more loyal customers to their cause. It's common to see phones with up to 12-megapixel cameras attached to them, which certainly makes digital cameras lose their appeal - after all, who wants to lug around an extra electronic when your cell phone can handle it all?

Apple seems to be thinking along the same lines, and recently filed a patent to have an iPhone with swappable lenses. Digital camera fans beware, since basic point-and-shoot cameras normally don't even have the option to change lenses.

For Apple, this could mean gaining a few consumers from the opposition, as Android phones don't have swappable lenses just yet. Meanwhile, for the digital camera industry, this is just another obstacle to overcome as they struggle with their hold on the market.

However, better pictures on your smartphone doesn't come without its quirks. While no official information has been released yet (such as, say, whether this is even going to be a feature in the next iPhone), one can only imagine what kind of an effect all the picture-taking and lens-swapping will have on your battery life.

Sources: appleinsider, pcmag



About eBatts.com

Laptop Batteries, Camcorder Batteries, Digital Camera Batteries, Cell Phone Batteries, Cordless Phone Batteries, PDA Batteries, UPS Batteries, Power Tool Batteries, Chargers and Power Adapters
The EBatts.com blog provides information and updates for new products, new battery technology & consumer electronic devices. Discover news on laptops, camcorders, digital cameras, cell phones and other battery powered electronics.
www.eBatts.com

Month List

Page List

    Sign in


    Batteries | Laptop Battery | Camcorder Battery | Digital Camera Battery | Cell Phone Battery | Cordless Phone Battery | PDA Battery
    Portable Power | UPS Battery | Digital Camera Battery | Batteries and Chargers | Power Tool Battery | Battery Types
    Product Returns | Corporate/Govt Login | Track Your Orders | Terms of Use | Affiliate Program | Resources
    Privacy/Security Policies | Customer Comments | Tip Configurator | Site Map
    © 1998-2011 eBatts.com