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Battery Life: iPad 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

clock June 17, 2011 01:00 by author Jeremy

A recent article on AllThingsD by Katherine Boehret compared the differences between the iPad 2 and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. While the prices are the same for each ($499 for the 16GB WiFi model, $599 for the 32GB WiFi model), differences include the camera, the physical size, and the app market.

Most importantly, however, was the difference in battery life. Boehret's testing (which included 75% screen brightness, WiFi-enabled, and a video loop) concluded that the iPad 2 would last just slightly over 10 hours, while the Galaxy Tab ran at a measly 5 hours 38 minutes in comparison.

Sure, the Galaxy Tab may be just a bit thinner (and really, who doesn't like sleek?) and have better camera quality; but is it worth half the battery life? Granted, it's doubtful people will be using the battery constantly like Boehret did in her testing, so I'm sure that the battery lasts longer than 5 hours on average. Nonetheless, it's something to consider when purchasing a tablet.

Source: AllThingsD

Find netbook batteries and tablet chargers at low prices on eBatts.com.



E3 2011 - Microsoft's Kinect, Sony's PSVita, and Nintendo's Wii U

clock June 11, 2011 01:25 by author Jeremy

This past week hasn't been shy as far as introducing new gadgets and technology. With WWDC on Monday, you'd think we couldn't have gotten any more excited (after all, iTunes Match seems fairly spiffy). Oh, how wrong we were.

Though E3 didn't officially start until Tuesday, we were already seeing keynotes on Monday. Microsoft pumped up their Kinect-system, showing off a slew of games such as Dance Central 2 and Kinect Star Wars. Other games were introduced that will still use the basic controller, but aren't left out from the Kinect system: voice-controls used through the Kinect's mic can be utilized during gameplay.

Even the main XBox360 menu is getting a makeover. The new UI will later include Bing voice search for Hulu, Netflix, live TV, and even YouTube. With this much integration of the Kinect, Microsoft likely won't even need a new console for quite some time.

On the other hand, Sony let out a bit of news on their NGP - now officially named the PlayStation Vita. This handheld has received quite the popularity since it was introduced in January, and there were several demos to be had. Several of these games are available for both PS3 and PSVita, and Sony announced that games can stop on one machine, only to pick up on a different one (for example, switching from your PS3 to your PSVita). Most importantly, though, was their announcement of the final price and date: $249 for the WiFi model or $299 for the 3G model, hitting stores this holiday season; AT&T will be the sole carrier. That's got to be one strong battery to display the crazy visuals of the Vita while maintaining internet connection...

Aside from their keynote, Sony also introduced the PlayStation-brand 24" 3D monitor and 3D glasses, available for $499 as a bundle. With these, you'll be sacrificing the comfort of your ears for the joy of being able to play with friends locally while viewing a full screen. According to Sony's press release, letting the Lithium Ion battery in these glasses charge for 3 minutes results in 3 hours of use, with 45 minutes bringing you roughly 30 hours of wear.

Meanwhile, Nintendo took a different approach to their keynote. After a large symphony orchestra playing through a montage of Zelda-scenes to honor the 25th anniversary, Nintendo dived into showing off new games for the Nintendo 3DS and the handheld's infamous AR (augmented reality). More importantly, though, was their announcement of a new system: the Wii U, which will make use of a 6" controller with a screen. You can use the controller to share pictures and videos from your tv to your handheld, or you can use it to play certain games (for example: holding it up to the screen while playing baseball makes it act as a virtual glove). Nothing was mentioned as far as how the remote will be powered or charged, however.

 

 

Oddly enough, the actual Wii U wasn't spoken as much as the Wii U remote was, but from photos during their keynote, it looks very similar to a Wii but with rounded edges. It will be backwards compatible, so all your odd Wii gadgets will work with it. The Wii U is scheduled to release in 2012.

 

Source: engadget, prnewswire



A Dead Battery in an Electric Car

clock June 9, 2011 19:34 by author Ty

So you got yourself a new electric car that runs 100% off of the power grid? It’s green, great for the environment, comes with tax benefits, there’s no gasoline or diesel bill at every fill up, and it’s the new trend everyone wants to be a part of by purchasing an electric vehicle. But what happens when you run out of juice in your electric vehicle?

You’re stranded! You ran out of battery power in your electric vehicle. An easy solution would be to call AAA and have a tow truck fix us up. Well, your electric car doesn’t take gasoline or diesel, so it will most likely end up being an expensive tow if you are not within your 10 mile free tow limit.

However, in Japan there is an ‘EV Rescue Vehicle’ operated by Nissan Motor Co and is equipped with a 29kW diesel generator that can partially charge a Nissan Leaf in 20 minutes to increase the range by 24 miles. There is nothing available in the United States that can provide services like the ‘EV Rescue Vehicle’ in Japan. General Motors and Toyota are currently talking to AAA about offering an emergency charging roadside assistance to eliminate range anxiety and allow EV car owners to drive further off of one full charge.

 

Your electric car will most likely need to be towed back home or to the nearest charging station if you run out of battery power.  Plan your trips wisely and be conservative on your range to ensure your ride back home is not on a tow truck. Electric cars may be great for the environment, but can be a real hassle for new EV car owners not familiar with EV range capabilities.

 

More frequently asked questions about Electric Vehicles (EV) can be found on Nissan’s Web site.
http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-electric-car/faq/

Sources:
http://www.caradvice.com.au/122439/nissan-leaf-evs-with-flat-batteries-rescued-by-diesel-trucks/
http://gigaom.com/cleantech/aaa-for-the-electric-vehicle-crowd/
http://www.autoweek.com/article/20110324/GREEN/110329945

Duracell Portable Power Products offer Power Inverters for Cars.



Keynotes from the D9 Conference, 2011

clock June 6, 2011 23:45 by author Jeremy

Engadget has done quite a number of liveblogs in their day, and their most recent stories are up from last week's D9 Conference. We'll give a quick wrap-up of the interviews from Google's Eric Schmidt, Hewlett-Packard's Leo Apotheker, Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky, Nokia's Stephen Elop, and AT&T's Ralph de la Vega. (Oh, and be sure to put on any cautionary-equipment you may have: these company reps get a lot of burns, hardballs, and snide comments thrown their way!)

Starting with Google's keynote on May 31st, we're presented with Managing Editor of the Wall Street Journal, Robert Thomson, followed soon after by- wait, seriously? Is that Glee's Jane Lynch?

Claiming to be the temporary CEO of "News Corp" (which, ironically, owns All Things Digital and thus D9), she apparently ripped on News Corp's iPad-only publication The Daily, cracked a joke about Glenn Beck, and even took a major swing at Sarah Palin! Talk about a grand opening for keynotes.

Eventually, Google's Eric Schmidt hit the stage and talked up Google Music as his first order of business. He admits earlier on that getting the music industry to work with non-Apple companies has been hard. He also defended Google's privacy-issues: some believe that they're just holding too much information, with even Steve Jobs calling Android a "probe in your pocket". According to Schmidt, data and information collected is only held for roughly 12 to 18 months, all of which is anonymous. And if you still think that Google has too much power with privacy, just take it from Schmidt himself: "If you've spent any time with the U.S. Government, you may start to feel more comfortable with this data in the hands of a private company." Ouch.

Their 12 to 18 month rule may not apply to Google Wallet, however: "[T]hat'll fall back onto widely regarding credit card policies already in place. We have a strong policy inside of Google to not data mine this stuff to create a surprise." Sounds good enough for me! This quote followed an actual demonstration of Google Wallet itself, which was also shown at the Google Wallet press event on May 26th.

On June 1st, there were three speakers to go through, starting with Hewlett-Packard's Leo Apotheker. With the combination of both HP and Palm, webOS is ready to become an active participant in the market against Android and iOS. And with webOS, HP is gaining a much larger foothold into the software business; it can be run on laptops, smartphones, and even printers. But being the large company that HP is, it has to battle against just about everyone on numerous fronts. Whether they can handle this Jack-of-all-trades approach has yet to be determined.

Later on in the day, D9 met with Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky, who gave a full preview of Windows 8. While this isn't the official name, Windows 8 is supposed to be Microsoft's OS for tablets. Rather than a start menu like Windows PCs have, the "desktop" will consist of tiles, like apps on a smartphone. The appearance of these will change depending on the tile: for example, a social networking tile's picture might reflect a recently-made post on twitter.

Also, there are different keyboard types and settings depending on how you want to use it. And at certain times (such as when running Excel), you'll run into familiar-looking Windows 7-esque desktop, to which Sinofsky commented, "We don't think people should have to give up things they know to deal with a new form factor."

The last keynote of the day was with Nokia's Stephen Elop. Much of this keynote revolved around Nokia's game-changing business plans, including their transition to Microsoft's Windows Phone instead of staying on the Symbian-train. According to Elop, staying with Symbian would have taken Nokia up to 6 years to really catch up with the rest of the world; siding with Android wouldn't have out well either due to issues revolving around differentiation.

Finally, on June 2nd, AT&T's CEO Ralph de la Vega had to defend against the onslaught of irritated demands and questions about his company's lack of service. Earlier in the interview, de la Vega promised better signal strength in both New York City and San Francisco. This transitioned to the subject of the possible AT&T / T-Mobile merger, which could help bring LTE service to 97% of the U.S. population, as opposed to the 80% AT&T could achieve on its own. Nonetheless, there was still much skepticism toward AT&T's LTE-service, comments over the possibility of overcharing in the past and current expensive prices.

De la Vega did have a bit of good (or at least interesting) news to share, though. First off, he made direct references to possible shared data plans between a single user's multiple devices. There aren't any official plans behind this yet, so it may be a while before we see it in action, if we even do. Also noted was the fact that their femtocells (which are used to help boost signal strength in relatively-weak areas) could actually reduce quality in areas with already-high signal; this wasn't known before, so be sure you're using the Femtocell accordingly!

Between the Google Wallet and webOS hoping to emerge well in the market, last week's D9 Conference went off with a hitch. Now all that's left is to see if these new fads catch on!

Source/Pictures: Engadget, AllThingsD



Duracell PowerSource 1800 UPS Emergency Power Video Review

clock May 26, 2011 00:37 by author Ty

When you're on the go and need basically a power-strip of AC sockets, the Duracell PowerSource 1800 will provide exactly what you're looking for. The Duracell PowerSource 1800 puts out 1800 watts of max power, with up to 1440 continuous watts. With its five AC outlets, you can run household appliances and other electronics such as a microwave, blender, toaster, refrigerator, blow dryer, flood lights, computers, and even charge your cell phone. Two wheels are on the back help makes transportation easier, and a display panel on the top shows remaining battery life and output power.

Duracell Powersource 1800

Duracell PowerPack 1800 Features:

  • 5 AC Outlets (1 on the front, 4 on the back).
  • Built-in transfer relay provides reliable backup power capability.
  • Recharges from home AC wall outlet.
  • Powerful enough to turn on almost any household appliance.
  • Audible alarm signals ten minutes prior to the unit running out of battery power.
  • Top display panel has a digital LED display that indicates the battery capacity status and total wattage of the devices connected to the PowerSource 1800.
  • Will supply 10 hrs backup power & over 1.5 hrs run time.
  • Rear-wheels for easy transportation.

Duracell PowerSource 1800 Specifications

AC
AC output power (max. continuous): 1440 W (2300 VA)
AC output power (5 min): 1800 W (2900 VA)
AC output surge capacity (peak): 3600 W
AC output voltage (nominal): 120 V
AC output frequency: 60 Hz
AC output waveform: Modified sine wave
Inverter no-load current: 0.6 A
Inverter low-battery alarm: 11.0 V
Inverter low-battery shutdown: 10.5 V

DC
Internal battery type: Sealed lead-acid
Internal battery capacity: 3 x 17 Ah, 12 V
Internal battery voltage: 12 Vdc (nominal)
DC power socket (circuit breaker): N/A

Physical Specs
Dimensions (L x W x H): 19.25" x 8.25" x 11.25"
Weight: 58.2 lbs
Operating temperature: 32°F to 104°F (0°C to 40°C)
Storage temperature: 32°F to 86°F (0°C to 30°C)

Charging System
AC charger bulk charging current: 5 A (maximum)
Peak charging voltage: 14.4 V (nominal)
Charge restart voltage: 13.5 V (nominal)
Float charge current: N/A
Charger input socket current: N/A

Charging Time
From AC outlet: Max. 15 hours
From DC outlet: N/A

 

Duracell Powersource 1800 LED Screen
Duracell Powersource 1800 LED Screen

 

Duracell Powersource 1800 1 AC Plug
Front - Duracell Powersource 1800 1 Outlet

 

 

Duracell Powersource 1800 4 AC Plugs

Back - Duracell Powersource 1800 4 Outlets

Check out the Duracell PowerSource 1800 on eBatts.com and all of the other Duracell Powerpack battery backup systems available.



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