With the rapid innovation of messaging apps, a common question called to mind is, "Which one am I supposed to use?" It's hard enough having to choose between which carrier or manufacturer we want to side with, let alone having to choose how you want to communicate. Long gone are the days of sending a simple text: nowadays, you might get your response back from a handful of different methods. Creators of apps and websites like SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, Viber and Kik are keeping their markets of consumers happy, but is there a way to bring them together to collectively keep our conversations in one medium?

From the sounds of it, the likelihood that these apps will align under one banner to create a convenient messaging stream for the rest of us, is slim. They are simply too different with their varying features, and people all over the world have their preferences - most seem to be specific to their region or country. What is popular in the United States may not be the preferred method in Australia or Japan. You could, of course, download a universal messaging app that combines them all - but it's still another 3rd party controlling it all.

However, that seems to to be just fine for many of these publishers, who have taken the laborious efforts of text/email and barely tweaked it just for their gain. Each group has their modicum of consumers, and we continue to use every means available, from video chat to picture texts, all for the sake of never losing touch.

But what we might not realize is that despite apps coming and going, our say in adapting and rejecting various forms of media will forge the necessary steps of innovation for creators in the future. Maybe we shouldn't be asking, "Which should I use?" but instead ask, "What do I want to help make popular, since it may have future potential?" We're already using multiple forms of communication - we might as well help push forward the good ideas and reject the bad or repetitive ones while we keep in touch.

Source: TheVerge